Article: Breaking down the epm business benefit

One of the biggest and earliest challenges in implementing enterprise project management is defining the benefits to management. Talking about epm system features or the intricacies of your project management process is of little interest to management unless you can tie it to how this will impact the organization overall. This article looks at how to define the business benefits of epm.

Article: EPM means different things to different people

There are so many articles and books on Enterprise Project Management but one of the first and biggest challenges comes when you discover that not everyone means the same thing by EPM. Each vendor, consultant and expert is colored by their experience and background. Making sure that everyone on your team is singing from the same hymn book when you’re starting an EPM project can make all the difference to success or failure.

Microsoft EPM – SQL Reporting Services samples

I was asked lately how to find the great reports and dashboards that Microsoft shows in its sales demonstrations.  Happily, Microsoft makes those example files available online for anyone who has Project Server 2007.  The reports are based on Microsoft SQL Reporting Services which has a wide range of reporting functionality.  You could, for example, […]

Article: Centralized or de-Centralized Project management

There is a movement afoot to promoted only centralized project management and you’d think you’d be most likely to hear that lecture on a site dedicated to enterprise project management like this one is. However, there’s nothing about the project management industry or the project management systems industry that makes centralized project management the ideal solution for every problem. Even here on EPM Guidance, we can come up with an argument for being more effective by having a de-centralized project management architecture. This article debunks the myth that only centralized project management is effective.

Article: It’s better to look integrated than be integrated

One of the grand debates in enterprise systems is whether you should be looking for one all-in-one tool or whether it’s better to look for the “best-of-breed” in each type of tool that you need. Can’t you do both? Use the all-in-one when it’s appropriate and the best-of-breed when the functionality outweighs the value of integration?